How to quickly learn Chinese grammar

How to quickly learn Chinese grammar

How to quickly learn Chinese grammar

Nowadays, many people don’t know how to learn Chinese grammar quickly, because there are too many Chinese grammars, so today I will explain how to learn Chinese grammar quickly.

In fact, the core grammar rules are very limited. 

If you want to learn all these grammatical rules in ​​textbooks, yes, you will never finish learning them. But never forget that your purpose of learning grammar is to understand sentences and articles, not the grammar itself. Remember, native speakers usually know little about grammar.

Then why learn grammar? Because native speakers learn language by being immersed in the environment from childhood and forming a “language awareness” in such a strong language environment. But for those non-native speakers who do not have such an environment, grammar is a fast way, because grammar is the summary and essence of language, it is the formula you can use to make unlimited sentences with limited words.

Note that the formula is not that difficult, and the core part of the grammar is actually only a small part. What is difficult to understand are those “phrases”, “idioms”, “slang” and other traditional expressions.

Learn to understand words and their forms

There is no tense of a verb, a verb has only one form.–Chinese grammar has no tense, and each verb has only one form. No matter what noun or pronoun you use, the form of the verb is the same. You only need to add characters to express tenses, and you don’t need to learn conjugate verbs, let alone irregular verbs.

“Single-character words” and “multi-character words”

In Chinese-although there are only three single-letter English words, a, I and O, single-symbol Chinese words are very common. For example, the character day means day or day; the symbol empty means empty in English. The combination of two or more characters leads to a new word. For example, sky means English sky. Because Chinese characters usually have no spaces between them except for punctuation marks, you must first be able to recognize and understand those “multi-character words” when reading in order to understand the entire sentence and the article.

Phrases and sensory groups

The combination of two or more words can form a stage, an idiom or “feeling group”, which is a difficult but important point in learning Chinese. Because Chinese characters usually have no spaces between each other except for punctuation marks, you must first be able to recognize and understand those “stages”, “idioms” and “sensation groups” when reading in order to understand the entire sentence and articles.

Chinese syntax

“Word order” and “sentence structure” are important, they are the key to understanding Chinese sentences. Like English, the order of words in Chinese syntax is subject-verb-object. For example, I learn English (I learn English) in exactly the same order as English.

The sentence can be divided into several different parts. Sentence elements are parts that play different grammatical roles in a sentence. The core sentence elements are the subject, predicate, and object, just like those in English, accompanying nouns, verbs and other elements of the sentence: attributive, adverbial, and complement.

Subject (noun), predicate (verb), object (noun)-most of the subject is at the beginning of the sentence, followed by the predicate part; this is the subject of a statement. For example: I love reading (I like reading)-I am the subject of this sentence. The predicate part is the part that states the subject. In the following sentence, the underlined part is the predicate.

Attributive (the symbol is “的”)-Attributives are used to modify nouns or noun phrases that are usually the subject or object of a sentence. In Chinese, “的” is a sign of attributive. For example: Nanjing is a beautiful city (Nanjing is a beautiful city)-beautiful is the attribute that describes the object of the city (city).

Chinese Suffix

The suffix of the particle “zhe” is a verb, which indicates the continuous aspect of the action. For example: a football match is going on (a football match is going on)

The particle “has” is the suffix of the verb to emphasize the completed past action. For example: I have finished reading (I finished reading a book.), she has gone (she left)

Add the particle “le” after the verb to emphasize the completed past action. For example: I finished reading the book (I finished reading a book.), she left (she left)

For things that have happened in the unspecified past, the particle “passes” is suffixed as a verb. For example: I have been to Beijing (I have been to Beijing), I have read this book (I have read this book).

The verb to want or think (want) can be used to express the future. For example, she wants to learn Chinese (she wants to learn Chinese)

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